#DNotes Who’s fault it is? It is the distolingual cuspid fault…

We find in the laboratory that the most common area needing additional reduction in the disto-lingual cuspid. Why? Well, we cannot assure the reason; but we believe it is related to the fact that it is the area of most difficult access when preparing the tooth; and the area which is not very convenient to check for adequate reduction.

Requirements Chart

Keep that in mind when preparing the tooth and take a look of this pocket chart with the minimal required reduction for a strong long lasting crown. Another culprit for minimal material space is an opposing cusp. Almost always the palatal of the 16 or 17. Don’t be afraid to reshape these with consent of course.

Have any questions about how we can assist? Feel free to email us at info@shantodental.com or fill in the form below:

#DNotes Ideal Access Hole – Middle of the Crowns or Axial

Is the implant crowns access hole decision made for aesthetic, convenience or mechanical reasons? 

As Technicians, we do understand dentist’s desire for screw-retention. However, we also want dentists to understand that in certain circumstances prioritizing screw-retention can lead to unwanted compromises which can be solved by deciding on cement retention instead! 

These days it is technically possible to screw-retain almost every implant case. But that should not lead to the conclusion that it is always desirable to do so! In other words, screw-retention does have some negative consequences. It is important to know what those consequences are so that you can make an informed decision when you decide on screw-vs. cement-retention. 

Have any questions about how we can assist? Feel free to email us at info@shantodental.com or fill in the form below:

#DNotes Splinting implants to natural teeth

Combined implant and tooth support

Technically, splinting implants to natural teeth can be done and we are asked to do it from time to time. So, it happens! However, finding published studies or literature on this treatment is as challenging as navigating a calcified MB2 on 16.

There is no doubt we will find lots of conflicting opinions; it is an ongoing and hotly debated issue.

This publication shares some good perspectives and situations to do, or not to do. It also suggests some great engineering options that we can surely provide if a treatment like this was accepted by your patient.

We always recommend full disclosure as to potential outcome. Make sure you have your patient review and sign a risk assessment form and document your case ! Not only for your own benefit, but also because we all need more information.

Have any questions about how we can assist? Feel free to email us at info@shantodental.com or fill in the form below:

#DNotes Triple Trays

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